How to Choose the Best Paralegal for YOUR Case

Choosing the best paralegal for your case can be difficult. With so many paralegals to choose from, how do you know who to pick? The best way to find the right paralegal is by knowing what type of case you have and what your needs are. There are a few things you should consider when looking for a paralegal:

Scope: What kind of legal issue are you having? Paralegals have scopes, so you will want to hire one who specializes in the area you need help in, such as Provincial Offences or Small Claims. Hiring a “jack of all trades” will not give you the professional expertise you really need if you have a particularly serious or complex matter. Here are Lighthouse Legal Services, we specialize in only one scope: quasi-criminal and regulatory offences, also known as Provincial Offences. That’s it! There’s no need for us to muddy the waters with any other kind of law– we want to master this scope, period.

Experience: How long has the paralegal been practicing? Has he or she dealt with cases similar to yours before? Have they run many trials and do they know all the players in your specific court? You want someone who has been around for a long time, knows the ins and outs of each court (they are all unique!), and has the experience to support the type of fight and passion you want from a representative.

Cost: How much will your case cost? Are there any extra fees that might be added on during the process? Are you willing to pay more for a paralegal with more experience? When dealing with an accident matter, or something that is intense with serious consequences for you, going the “cost effective” route may not be your best option, because you could be sacrificing service, experience, and attention, but you need to ensure your fees are affordable at the same time.

Big firm vs. small firm (or sole practitioner): Here are Lighthouse Legal Services, we’ve worked with the “big firms”. We know how they operate and how your file will be treated. If you want a boutique experience, including specialized attention to your file by one or two people max, and personalized communication, you will probably want to go for a smaller firm or sole practitioner. Sole practitioners and smaller firms are also more available to you: they can text you when you would like, speak to you on the phone when they aren’t in court and on weekends when you aren’t at work, and can generally give you more attention than big firms. You aren’t a case number with Lighthouse Legal Services– you are a valued client!

Your initial interaction: How do you feel when you speak with this person? Do you have a good rapport and do you feel comfortable? Were they able to make you feel calmer about your situation? Were they able to give you an idea of what to expect out of your case, and the pros and cons of your choices at first? How did that make you feel? Did you feel comfortable asking questions and for clarification, if needed? Do you feel you are able to contact them without feeling like you are “bugging” them (we hope you never feel this way with us!)? Did you feel pressure to retain them right away?

We hope that these tips are helpful when thinking about which paralegal to retain. There are many firms and practitioners out there, so you need to choose the one that is right for you. If you decide that firm is Lighthouse Legal Services, great!

Senior Drivers & Licenses

Are you a senior driver looking for quick information about your licensing conditions? Look no more!

If you are 70 years of age or older and a G or M driver involved in a collision

Anyone who is 70 or older and holds a G or M class license and is involved in an collision will have to do an examination that includes:

• A written test regarding the rules of the road
• An in-car test
• Medical and physical exams, tests, and procedures to determine fitness to drive
• A vision test

Regardless of what happens with your ticket, or even if you weren’t issued a ticket, you will be facing a test if you are over 70 years of age and involved in a collision.

If you are 80 years of age or older and a G or M driver in general


Anyone who is 80 or older and holds a G or M class license will need to do an examination every two years to keep their license. You will have to:

• Take a vision test
• Undergo a driver record review
• Participate in a 45-minute Group Education Session (GES)
• During the GES, complete two, brief, non-computerized in-class screening assignments
• If necessary, take a road test

Note: There is no charge for any of the license-renewal requirements– you only have to pay the license-renewal fee.

If you are a commercial driver 65 to 80 years of age

Anyone who is 65 to 80 years of age and holds an A, B, C, D, E, or F class license and is involved in an accident or accumulates more than two demerit points will need to do an examination that includes:

• A written test regarding the rules of the road
• An in-vehicle test — in the vehicle that you are authorized to drive
• An in-vehicle test, in the vehicle that you are authorized to drive but is equipped with air brakes
• An examination of your knowledge of air brakes, their function, and safe operation of
• Medical and physical exams, tests, and procedures to determine fitness to drive
• A vision test

Anyone under the age of 80 who holds a class A, B, C, D, E, or F license will have to do the above mentioned examination every five years, but depending on your age will have to demonstrate that you continue to meet the qualifications at different years.

Anyone 80 years or older with a class A, B, C, D, E, or F license will have to do the above exam every year and demonstrate that you continue to meet the qualifications every year.

All of this information is located in sections 15 & 16 of Ontario Regulation 340/94 of the Highway Traffic Act.